Underwater artwork becomes the Whitsundays newest attraction

Four of the six major sculptures (Turtle Dream, Maori Wrasse, Manta Ray and Migration of the Mantas) have been installed in the Great Barrier Reef at popular tourism sites damaged by ex-Cyclone Debbie. 

A huge thank you to the expert team from David Edge Marine Contracting, Whitsunday Mooring and Marine Constructions, artists, QPWS and GBRMPA for working collaboratively with Reef Ecologic to successfully deploy the sculptures. Bywa will be installed in Horseshoe Bay during August (weather permitting). Anthozoa is under construction and anticipated date of completion and installation is September.

In a Queensland first, Langford Reef in the Whitsunday Islands will become home to a new installation of underwater and inter-tidal art.

A trial installation of the artwork is being funded through the Queensland Government and Federal Government’s $7 million Tourism Recovery Fund to assist the Whitsundays tourism industry post Cyclone Debbie.

Four sculptures by local artist Adriaan Vanderlugt were unveiled at the annual Whitsunday Reef Festival (2 - 5 Aug, 2018), which will provide a new experience for people travelling to the Whitsundays and help the marine tourism sector recover after Cyclone Debbie.

The artwork includes sculptures of fish, a nudibranch and a crab, all varying in size and weighing up to 300 kilograms with one already located at Langford Island near Hayman.

Bareboat charterers can visit the locations and see the artwork first hand with each piece  being moved from the beach to intertidal to underwater environments a month at a time and the artworks will be secured and monitored to prevent interference and damage.

Tourism Industry Development Minister Kate Jones said to lure more visitors to the Whitsundays, we need to invest in new tourism product. Around the world - from the Caribbean, to the Maldives, Spain, Bali and Australia’s west coast, underwater art has been used to lure visitors.